Orientation Courses

Course Code and Credits: ITL 107 US - ITL 3821 UK (2)
Course Title: Elementary Italian I - Orientation
Course Description : Designed for students who have never taken any Italian language course before. Students build an essential vocabulary and assimilate basic grammar and sentence structures. Instruction is based on listening, grammar and comprehension exercises, repetition and easy conversation.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 108 US - ITL 3822 UK (2)
Course Title: Elementary Italian II - Orientation
Course Description: This is a preparatory course to the intermediate level, designed for students who have already had one or two semesters of Italian. Although the course starts with basic grammar structures of the language, the pace is faster than Italian 103. Conversation is a central part of every lesson. Admission is based on testing in Italian.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 207 US - ITL 4821 UK (2)
Course Title: Intermediate Italian I - Orientation
Course Description: Students will develop the ability to communicate in Italian correctly and with expanded vocabulary. Conversational practice, including improved listening and interpreting skills , will encourage students to better understand and respond to normal Italian speech. Exercises in reading and writing will improve skills in understanding prose and in writing letters and simple messages. Admission is based on a placement test in Italian. Prerequisite: 3 or 4 semesters of Italian.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 208 US - ITL 4822 UK (2)
Course Title: Intermediate Italian II - Orientation
Course Description: Reviews complex grammar structures and provides students with exercises in reading, composition, phonetics, syntax and style. Continued practice in conversation will provide students with increased capability to communicate competently in Italian. Admission is based on testing in Italian. Prerequisite: 4 or 5 semesters of Italian.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 273 US - AVC 4800 UK (1)
Course Title: Introduction to Italian Art
Course Description: Designed to introduce students to the history of several periods, this course is taught primarily during the on site visits to Venice, Florence and Naples. Richmond professors lecture before and during the excursions on artistic and historical developments in Italy. Students are required to write an art history paper on a topic assigned by the professors, related to the visits.

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COURSES TAUGHT IN REGULAR SEMESTER

With the exception of Italian (which is required), courses are taught in English, Monday through Thursday. A minimum enrollment of 10 is required for each course. Semester credits are in parenthesis after course titles.

Italian Language | Art, Design, and Media | Art History | Communications | Economics | History | Intl. Relations/Sociology | Literature | Management | Marketing  |  Political Science Religion  |  Service Learning  |  Sociology |

Italian Language

Conversation is a central part of every lesson. After Orientation students may choose between the Basic Spoken Italian (1 credit) or the continuation of the Italian course taken during Orientation (4 credits).

Course Code and Credits: ITL 105 US - ITL 3810 UK (1)
Course Title: Basic Spoken Italian
Course Description: This "survival" course is aimed at reinforcing the use of the structures acquired during the 2 week orientation course. Meets 2.5 hours per week and gives students a basic vocabulary to deal with authentic everyday situations.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 112 US - ITL 3842 UK (4)
Course Title: Elementary Italian II
Course Description: Designed for students with one or two semesters of Italian. Although the course starts with basic grammar structures, it moves faster than Elementary Italian I. Meets 5 hours per week. Conversation is central part of every lesson.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 211 US - ITL 4841 UK (4)
Course Title: Intermediate Italian I
Course Description: This continuation of Italian 104 in orientation meets 5 hours per week. Students reach a solid level of linguistic competence. Prerequisite: ITL 112 or equivalent.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 212 US - ITL 4842 UK (4)
Course Title: Intermediate Italian II
Course Description: This continuation of Italian 203 in orientation meets 5 hours per week. Use of the language is perfected and a solid level of expression is attained through the choice of the most appropriate vocabulary and the use of complex tenses. Prerequisite: ITL 211 or equivalent.

Course Code and Credits: ITL 303 US - ITL 5830 UK (3)
Course Title: Advanced Italian
Course Description: With a focus on reviewing complex syntactic structures this course will provide exercises in use of synonyms and idiomatic expressions. Students will analyze readings from contemporary authors, including samples of fiction and articles from newspapers and magazines. Admission is based on a placement test in Italian. Prerequisite: ITL 212 or 5 to 6 semesters of Italian.

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Art, Design and Media

Course Code and Credits: ADM 341 US - ADM 5860 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Photography for the Media
Course Description: Recommended for Communications and Journalism majors as well as photographers, this course develops knowledge and experience in photojournalism and documentary photography by studying the work of major practitioners and designing and shooting projects using digital equipment. Students are required to produce a number of documentary style projects and need to provide a digital camera of at least 7 mega pixel and a laptop. There is a lab fee of € 80.00 to cover printing.

Course Code and Credits:ADM 103 US - ADM 3800 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Sketchbook of Rome
Course Description: Students are introduced to many types of drawing and work from still life, natural forms, and the light model.
This course encourages experimentation in the two-dimensional representation of form, space, structure, and texture. Students learn to observe more closely through the discipline and thus to appreciate art more fully. A studio fee is levied on this course.

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Art History

Course Code and Credits: ARH 305 UK - AVC 5810 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Introduction to Renaissance and Baroque Art in Rome
Course Description: This introductory course surveys the development of painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy from the fourteenth through the mid-seventeenth centuries. These four centuries mark the passage from the Middle Ages to Modernity, through the rediscovery of the heritage of the Classics, the transformation of Christian Europe that followed Luther's Reformation and the passage from feudalism to absolutism. The course focuses on Rome and offers the unique possibility of studying on site the masterpieces of great artists such as Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio and Bernini. Much of the course is taught on site.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 308 US - AVC 5840 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Art and Culture in Rome: 800 BC - 2000 AD
Course Description: This is an introduction to major art historical themes, methods and approaches. This course gives the students a knowledge of Rome's history and society, an overview of its architectural and artistic expressions over a development span of 3000 years. Much of the course is taught on site with visits to churches, palaces and museums.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 309 US - AVC 5830 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History of Ancient Art: Greece & Rome
Course Description: The course examines the main motives and themes related with study, analysis and appreciation of ancient art. Students study the Idea of Classic, so largely part of the western culture, and so widely object of misinterpretation. The analysis of Greek art, the relation between Greek and Roman art, our position before Classical art, continuity, discontinuity, inspiration from antiquity and misunderstanding of antiquity are the main subjects covered in class. The city of Rome offers the best instruments for this art itinerary. Much of the course is taught on site.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 321 US - AVC 5845 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Baroque Rome and Its Monuments
Course Description: The emergence of Baroque art in the late Cinquecento and early Seicento. Further developments of the Baroque style in mid to late Seicento sculpture, painting and architecture. Study the works of Caravaggio, Bernini and Borromini, a source of inspiration for many other artists. Much of the course is taught on-site in Rome.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 322 US - AVC 5805 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: High Renaissance Art
Course Description: High Renaissance Art surveys the development of painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy from the 14th to the 15th centuries, focusing in particular upon the cultural context of Rome with reference also to the contributions of Florence and Venice. Much of the course is taught on-site, allowing students to gain first-hand experience of the masterpieces of Bramante, Raphael and Michelangelo within the historical and urban context.

Course Code and Credits: ARH 324 US - AVC 5850 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Michelangelo in Rome
Course Description: The works of the Renaissance master, his sculpture, painting, architecture and literary production. His works are investigated within the specific historical context, focusing on issues of commission, iconography, censorship, biography, historiography and aesthetics. Beyond a complete comprehension of Michelangelo's work, the course aims toward a mastery of art historical research skills, the evaluation of current scholarship and independent critical thought on art. Much of the course is taught on-site. Recommended to students with art history major or good art history background.

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Communications

Course Code and Credits: COM 308 US - COM 5855 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: News and the Media in Italy
Course Description: Concentrates on the different styles and tones of voice used in journalism. It focuses on print, although there will be analysis of other media, such as radio and television. Particular attention will be given to the development of writing styles for new, features, interviews and reviews. Students also carry out detailed analysis of information and styles from a range of media. In Italy students will be required to collaborate with a local newspaper, publishing articles and working with local press offices.

Course Code and Credits: COM 315 US - FLM 5800 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History of Italian Cinema and Society
Course Description: The course introduces students to the history of Italian cinema as well as inviting a reflection on the evolution of Italian society as represented in film. Post-war Italian cinema offers a valuable range of films for such a study. By the end of this course students acquire some knowledge of Italian cinema within the context of world cinema, an understanding of realism as an aesthetic convention and gain a useful insight into Italian culture and ways of thinking.

Course Code and Credits: COM 461 US - COM 5845 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Luxury Fashion in Rome
Course Description: This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and the media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamism, fantasy componenets, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how cities function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes. Prerequisite: Senior Status or permission of the instructor. 

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Economics

Course Code and Credits: ECN 357 US - ECN 5805 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: International Economic Relations
Course Description: Examines economic and monetary relations between nations and groups of countries. Institutional, political and historical factors that shape the international economic environment. Globalization, regional integration, multilateral negotiations, trade policies and development of world trade.

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History

Course Code and Credits: HST 311 US - HST 5805 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Rome through the Ages
Course Description: The history of Rome from its reputed founding by Romulus and Remus to the establishment of the Roman Republic and the creation of the Roman Empire and the conversion to Christianity with the appointment of the first Pope. Much of the course is taught with visits to major archaeological sites.

Course Code and Credits: HST 314 US - HST 5815 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History of Food and Table Manners
Course Description: This course will focus on food and food habits in human history, from early civilization through the Classical world, th Middle Ages and the Modern Period. We will be treating themes such as: the social function of banquets, dietary rules, food models, cultural identity and table manners. In the course we will look at evidence largely based on written sources, as well as archaeological and artisti records. Much of the course is taught on site.

Course Code and Credits: HST 326 US - HST 5820 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History of the Italian Mafia
Course Description: The course analyses the Italian Mafia through an historical, social and cultural perspective, tracing its progression from the Borbonic Reign to the present day. Differences between the Italian and the American Mafia will also be taken into consideration. An analysis of the sociological aspects of the Mafia will be developed, including "the language of the mafioso", "the code of silence", the ways of violence, messages and messengers, structures of power, profits and losses, and the relationship between Mafia, politics, and religion.

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International Relations/Sociology

Course Code and Credits: INR 306 US - INR 5805 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Human Rights
Course Description: This course will cover the evolution of international human rights and of the various national, regional and international mechanisms designed for their protection. It will examine the theoretical foundations of the idea of human rights in various civilizations and cultures, evaluate its legacy within western and non-western traditions, and examine its meaning and relevance in addressing major issues in the contemporary world.
The class principally draws on the theories and methodological approaches of the following disciplines: Sociology, International Law and International relations.

Course Code and Credits: INR 328 US - INR 5810 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Security Studies
Course DescriptionThis course examines enduring and contemporary questions of security and insecurity in the international system. Security has traditionally been defined in terms of strategic state politics and the use of military force to counter external military threats. The end of the Cold War and the ensuing conflicts of the late-20th century raised questions about the continued relevance of traditional theories of security. New security threats have been defined both in the academic literature and by state security strategies. This course critically evaluates these developments using IR and security studies theories, supplemented by practical case-studies. Students investigate the definition of the term security and threats to security, questions about the referent object of security, the root causes of insecurity and the methods of eliminating or lessening such threats. The course evaluates traditional and contemporary security concepts such as national security, conventional weapons systems, nuclear non-proliferation, human security, responsibility to protect, the poverty-security nexus in a post-Westphalian context.

Course Code and Credits: INR/SCL 313 US - INR 5800 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Globalization: A European Perspective
Course Description: The new millennium is witnessing a world that is developing into a single place. Students explore the complex social, economic, political cultural and environmental dynamics of the global society and become familiar with the causes and implications of the globalization process.

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Literature

Course Code and Credits: LIT 327 US - LIT 5800 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Italian Literature in Translation
Course Description: Literary works by major Italian writers and major Italian literary trends from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. Students develop background knowledge of Medieval and Renaissance Italian literary history and the ability to analyze a literary text.

Course Code and Credits: LIT 329 US - PHL 5800 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Classical Mythology
Course Description: Traditional stories of Greece and Rome in their cultural context. Readings from Greek and Latin literature investigate their sources, nature and applications to literature and art. Students examine key figures and events in mythology, including gods and major heroes, with on-site analysis of paintings, sculptures, poetry and mosaics.

Course Code and Credits: LIT 330 US - LIT 5815 UK, fall only (3)
Course Title: Roman Life and Thought
Course Description: This course illustrates the most important works of classical antiquity. Students read in translation Latin authors such as Virgil, Ovid, Cesar, Cicero, familiarize with different literary genres and understand the basis of European literary culture. Major topics include aspects of ancient civilisation, such as rhetoric, politics, religion, mythology, philosophy.

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Management

Course Code and Credits: MGT 302 US - MGT 5850 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Project Management for the Arts and Culture
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the concepts of project management relevant to the cultural industry. The theoretical basis will be applied to the industry of arts and culture. The course focuses on case studies that are related to Rome’s Cultural Heritage. Students will acquire knowledge, skills and competencies to understand the fundamental tenets of project management. The Italian cultural environment will be studied; particular attention will be paid to its inherent value. Furthermore this course offers students the opportunity to identify current problems that are related to the management of the Italian cultural heritage. The skills learned may also be applied to different international contexts.

Course Code and Credits: MGT 358 US - MGT 5810 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Human Resource Management
Course Description: Combines elements of different disciplines, ranging from industrial relations, social psychology, personnel management, motivation, recruitment and selection, leadership, communication, manpower planning, aspects of training and development, and related processes. It is appropriate both for those seeking a career in personnel management and for those contemplating careers in other areas of functional management.

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Marketing

Course Code and Credits: MKT 301 US - MKT 5800 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Principles of Marketing
Course Description: Principles and operations of the marketing process with an in-depth look at the role of marketing in business planning, how the marketing mix operates and the role of strategic marketing in today's business environment.

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Political Science

Course Code and Credits: PLT 302 US - PLT 5805 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Italian Society: From Fascism to the Present
Course Description: Italian political life from the rise of fascism to the present. Institutional developments since Mussolini, analysis of political parties, the Red Brigades, Italy and the EU and church-state relations.

Course Code and Credits: PLT 331 US - PLT 5800 UK, fall only (3)
Course Title: Ethnicity and Identity
Course Description: Examines the questions of whether ethnicity is a universal phenomenon, and if ethnic conflict is inevitable.
Investigates why ethnicity has become such an important tool of political organization in the twentieth century. This course examines ethnicity and to a lesser extent nationalism, as the base of social and political belonging and differentiation and the source of both creativity and conflict. Starting with the premise that identity is socially constructive the ways in which ethnic identity has been formed and used in different societies is examined. Different theories of ethnicity are explored during the course, as well as specific case studies.

Course Code and Credits: PLT 359 US - PLT 5810 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: The European Union in the New International System
Course Description: The historical background of the EU, the dynamics of the European integration process, the European institutions and their functioning, the interrelationship between the EU, the states members and the U.S., the EU policies such as agriculture, regional, social, environmental, energy and monetary policies.

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Religion

Course Code and Credits: RLG 300 US - RLG 5810 UK, fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Comparative World Religions
Course Description: Explores the monotheistic religions of the Near East (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), those of India and the Far East (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism) and the "new age" faiths. The history and practice o f each is studied . Special emphasis is laid on the philosophical and psychological basis of each religion and common themes such as "the self" and suffering. Primary and secondary sources are studied along with an examination of methodology in comparative religion. Guest speakers and class visits form an integral part of the course.

Course Code and Credits: RLG 315 US - RLG 5800 UK, spring only (3)
Course Title: Religions and Cults of the Roman Empire
Course Description: An introduction to the religious experience of Late Antiquity, which opened the way to medieval civilization and, eventually, to modern Western culture.
This course introduces students to the extremely complex, and often amazingly modern richness of the religious beliefs and cults of the Roman Empire (I-IV century A.D.). All the main religions, cults and mystical movements will be considered and examined in order to give the student a complete picture of this fascinating historical period.

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Service Learning

Course Code and Credits
: ISL 300 US - ISL 5800 UK, fall/spring (3)

Course Title: Service Learning and Active Citizenship
Course Description: The Service Learning and Active Citizenship course is a student community placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse community in Italy. In addition to the weeks of field work (typically 9-12 depending on the organisation), the students will also produce a written journal of their experience which provides critical reflection (learning log), a ‘community action’ portfolio (analytical essay), and a final oral presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the students reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the service learning experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the service learning course, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the community placement is a successful one.

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Sociology

Course Code and Credits: SCL 307 US - COM 5860 UK, fall only (3)
Course Title: Made in Italy: Symbols of Italian Identity
Course Description: Italy occupies a prominent place in the world's culture, history, and thought. This course will consider the history and practices of consumption in Italy, and the consumption of goods, products, and services that have been encoded as "Italian" outside the country itself. It analyses aspects of consumption (broadly defined) through a social, cultural, artistic and anthropological approach. Symbols of "Italian-ness" may include themes such as the transition to a consumer society, investigating areas such as advertising, fashion, industrial design, food culture and sport, and the impact of consumption in processes such as Italian identity formation and the construction of gender roles. The course normally includes on site visits and field trips.